Personal Information
Name Personal
Alberto Cartano Anna Cartano Gascoigne visted Alberto Cartano in Italy and had the following report on Monday, July 5, 1999 12:55 PM:

Bon Journo from Italia,
Good news. The Cartano's missing link has been located in Navara Italy close to Milan. Alberto Cartano was overjoyed to find relatives still alive. His father, Dante Cartano, was conceived in the mountains of Domodosola and "abandone" which is the nice Italian expression for left behind. Only the prominent name of Cartano graced his wee bed clothing. Now for the first time since l9l3, Alberto has hopes of finding the "Cartano" connection. He says that Anna Cartano (that's me) looks just like his sister. This may be the evidence he's been looking for. But who was the father? Could it have been patriarch Antonio? Is that why Antonio lost favor with the Catholic church? Why he fled to America and changed the family name from Cardono to Cartano? Or did Antonio have a brother who couldn't keep his hands off the country girls? Sounds like a Cartano to me! Stay posted for more speculation.

Contact Anna Cartano for a taped interview with father Alberto, his wife, daughter and friends
Alberto Cartano (Phillipines) Hi David.

I have just learned based on stories passed on from one generation to another, and then as recollected by our older living relatives, that our great grandfather...Alberto Cartano who was born in 1908 was the grandson of a Spanish-Italian soldier who came to the Philippines during the Spanish colonization. I'm trying to see if we have records during that time but based on my research...most records were lost/destroyed during the Second World War. Sadly ,it looks like it's almost impossible to trace ancestral records here now.

Sincerely,

Rowena (Rowie ) Cartano
rowecartano2@gmail.com
Alice Mary Troy Cartano The Social Security records show that Alice Cartano died in November 1965 in Iowa, Social Security No. 484-05-4341.
Ann Cartano Ann Cartano graduated from Lawrence College in Wisconsin. She is the daughter of David G. Cartano and Joan Cartano.
Anna Cartano Anna Cartano is the fourth to the left, second row standing, in the historic photograph of the Anton and Caroline Klein Cartano family. She never married and died in her early thirties.

The 1905 Linn County, Iowa census shows that Anna Cartano lived in Springville, Iowa.
Anna Louise Cartano Luper My name is Anna Louise (Cartano) Luper. I have just recently found out from Oregon l880 census records that Anthony and Caroline Cartano were my great-grandparents. Lamburtus (Bert) and Anna Rebecca (Harden) Cartano were my grandparents. Richard and Velma (Basler) Cartano are my parents.

My grandfather, Bert, came to Athena, Oregon as a major league baseball player from Iowa, where he met my grandmother, Anna Harden. He stayed and they got married and had three children. Bert and my father, Richard, came to Granger, Washington in 1928. Where Richard met my mother, married and raised 5 girls. There are now children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren.

I have no idea who will be receiving this, but I would appreciate an acknowledgement. I hope to update some of the Cartano records and learn about a family that I know nothing about. I'm still trying to find out who Anthony's father was and when he immigrated and to what state. So many questions to be answered. I can be reached thru my e-mail address: Aluper27@aol.com. My home address is: Anna Luper, 3454 E. Zillah Dr., Zillah, WA 98953
Anna Maria Cartano The baptism records show that Anna Maria Cartano was bBaptized May 4, 1845, Roemisch-Katholische, Planig, Rheinhessen, Hessen, Germany
Anne R. Cartano Anna R Cartano died 1950
Author: brian futrell Date: 25 Mar 2003 9:42 PM GMT
Surnames: Harden, Cartano, Underwood, Dennis
Anna R. Cartano died about September 13, 1950 in Pendleton, OR. Her parents were John and Sarah J. Harden, of Athena,OR. Anna Cartano had two daughters: Mrs. Edra Dennis and Mrs. Enid J. Underwood. Her son: Richard Cartano, of Granger, WA. Anna had a brother named Jasper Harden, of Salem, OR. I am looking for any living descendants of Anna(Harden) Cartano. I have information to give to them and would like to know if anyone has any information about Anna's ancestors. Please contact me if you know of anyone who might know anything about Anna.

Sarah Harden was born 1852 in Missouri. She moved to California while still a baby with her parents. She married John Harden when she was 17. Her parents were Reuben Hail and Maryann Inman. When she died, she had five daughters and two sons. Mrs. Mary McKay, Mrs. Chester McCullough, Mrs Gerald Kilgore, Mrs. Anna Cartano, Mrs Aarthur Shick. Her sons were W.R. Harden and Jasper Harden. Do you know any of the descendants of Sara Harden and her children? Please contact me if you know anything at all about this family.

Sarah Jane Hail was born 1852 in Missouri to Reuben and Mary Ann (Inman) Hail. They traveled to California where Sarah Jane grew up and married John Hardin. They moved to Oregon where on 31April 1931 Sarah Jane passed away in Athena, Umatilla County, Oregon. They had children; Mary J.(Mc Kay) ; Katy F.(McCollough); Edna(Kilgore); Anne R.(Cartano); Jessie(Shick); William R.; Jasper; plus another girl who married a Levi Savage. If you know of any descendants of this family, please contact me. brian in springfield missouri
Anton (Antonio) Cartano The history of Anton Cartano is set forth in the History section of this Internet Web site.
Anton (Dony) Cartano Dony Cartano is the second to the left, second row standing, in the historic photograph of the Anton and Caroline Klein Cartano family. He worked in a billiard parlor and sold soft drinks in Springville, Iowa. He never married.
Arlene Beatrice Bock Cartano The Social Security records show that Arlene Cartano died on September 24, 2002. Her social security number is 485-07-4749.
Artemio V. Cartano The Social Security records show that Artemio Cartano guy on March 15, 1988. The Social Security number was 566-96-0217.
Aurelio Cartano, Jr. Hi,My name is Aurelio Cartaño jr. i dont know if we are related,my Cartaño
is with an Ñ,anyway we are from the Philippines,my grandfather told me that
we came from a spanish ancestors i dont know if is precise,he said we have
been here since the early 1700 ihave been wondering where we realy came
from,now its nice to know that i've finally found some lead to where we
might came from just to teel you something about us,the early known Cartaño
is the father of my grandfather Pedro Cartano,they had four chidren,Alberto
the oldest and i dont know the names of the other 3 i will ask my father
about that,Alberto my grandfather had 4children,Aurelio Sr. my
father,Patricia,Remedios and Librado,they are now all living in laguna a
province in Luzon the northern part of the Philippines,My dad has 7
children,Rene,Ronaldo,Rowena,Roberto,Rosa Mia whos now in Canada,Ricardo and
me Aurelio,all of them have their own families except me,I will try to
gather some more information about our history and i will let you know.

Regards,
Aurelio

#11 Kentucky St.Bambang Taguig
Metro Manila,Philippines
Bessie Cartano Peterson The obituary in the local newspaper for Jessie Cartano Waln states that Bessie Peterson was one of the three surviving sisters of Jessie Cartano Waln, and that Bessie lived in Council Bluffs, Iowa at that time.
Blanche Thompson Cartano The Social Security records show that Blanche Cartano died on July 16, 1995 in Florida, Social Security No. 261-43-6537.

After her husband died, Blanche wrote a letter to David Cartano stating the following:

"I live alone in the home we built fifteen years ago -- love it here. So many Iowa people spend winters here [in Florida], so there are no dull moments. Besides, I love bridge, pinochle, scrabble--all games--crafts--my organ--the beach and shells!"

The following information was found at the following WebSite:

http://www.cam-walnet.com/~huberj/d77.htm

Blanche Bernice Thompson was born on 23 Jun 1898 in Hopkinton farm, Del. Co., Iowa. She was christened. She died. She was buried.

She was married to Wilbur Richard Cartano on 28 Jun 1922. Wilbur Richard Cartano was born on 13 Aug 1897 in Monticello, Iowa. He died on 7 Jul 1972 in Venice, Florida. He was christened. He was buried in Ewing Funeral, Venice, Florida. Blanche Bernice Thompson and Wilbur Richard Cartano had the following children:

593 i. Carol Anne Cartano was born on 4 Jul 1923. She was christened. She died. She was buried.
+594 ii. Richard Bruce Cartano was born on 3 Jul 1925. He was christened. He died. He was buried.
595 iii. David Garvin Cartano was born on 6 Apr 1935. He was christened. He died. He was buried.
596 iv. Laurence Alan Cartano was born on 7 Nov 1938. He was christened. He died. He was buried.
Bruce A. Cartano A letter from Blanche Cartano to David Cartano stated that Bruce died in a car accident when he was 18 years old.
Carol Anne Cartano The Social Security records show that Carol Cartano died on July 4, 1923, Social Security No. 484-14-4859.

The obituary for Wilbur Cartano in 1972 states that Carol was living in Coral Gable, Florida at that time.

A letter from Blanche Cartano to David Cartano stated that Carol was living in Sarasota about 20 miles from Blanche, her mother, and that she was a bookkeeper.

See additional discussion of her early personal life in the section on David Garvin Cartano.
Caroline Sophie Klein Cartano The history of Caroline Sophie Klein Cartano is set forth in the History section of this Internet Web site.
Cartano (first name unknown) The father of Anton Cartano emigrated from Northern Italy into Germany at the age of seven. He was not very tall, had light hair and blue eyes. He married a German girl. His trade was a silversmith. Louise Cartano, daughter of Anton Cartano, use to say that the Cartanos were from Milan, Italy. They had a good background. She thought that there was some nobility in the family.
Charles Cartano Charles Cartano is the second to the right, second row standing, in the historic photograph of the Anton and Caroline Klein Cartano family. He was born on July 22, 1857 in the town of Pottsville, Pennsylvania, County of Schuylkill. He grew up and lived most of his life in Springfield, Iowa. He had a large family. One of his youngest children was Jessie Mae Cartano Waln. She was an excellent teacher and school principal in Iowa.

The 1905 Linn County, Iowa census shows that Charles Cartano lived in Springville, Iowa.
Christian J. Cartano Brothers and sisters are: Jeff Cartano ( on dad's side from 1st marriage) Sandie Sellers Adams, Deborah Sellers Dalziel, Rodney Sellers ( on mom's side from 1st marriage)
Christopher W. Cartano Brother of Bruce Cartano
Daniel (Dan) A. Cartano Dan Cartano is the second to the left, first row sitting, in the historic photograph of the Anton and Caroline Klein Cartano family. Even though he had a middle initial, he did not have a middle name.

The history of Dan Cartano is set forth in the History section of this Internet Web site.
Dante Cartano Anna Cartano Gascoigne visted the son of Dante Cartano, Alberto Cartano, and had the following report on Monday, July 5, 1999:

Bon Journo from Italia,

Good news. The Cartano's missing link has been located in Navara Italy close to Milan. Alberto Cartano was over joyed to find relatives still alive. His father, Dante Cartano, was conceived in the mountains of Domodosola and "abandone" which is the nice Italian expression for left behind. Only the prominent name of Cartano graced his wee bed clothing. Now for the first time since l9l3, Alberto has hopes of finding the "Cartano" connection. He says that Anna Cartano (that's me) looks just like his sister. This may be the evidence he's been looking for. But who was the father? Could it have been patriarch Antonio? Is that why Antonio lost favor with the Catholic church? Why he fled to America and changed the family name from Cardono to Cartano? Or did Antonio have a brother who couldn't keep his hands off the country girls? Sounds like a Cartano to me! Stay posted for more speculation.
Contact Anna Cartano for a taped interview with father Alberto, his wife, daughter and friends.

_________________________________________________



Anna Cartano Gascoigne visited Alberto Cartano in Italy in 1999, and wrote the following poem about Dante Cartano, who abandoned his son, Alberto Cartano when Alberto was a baby:


Missing Cartano

Bella Dante,
Domadosolla baby,
Conceived beneath alpine skies,
Given to strangers,
Never told why.

Bella Dante,
Who stole your wee cries?
Did you break mama's heart?
Or rob papa's pride?

Bella Dante,
I recognize those eyes,
Rings of topaz
Set in fire and ice.
And that aristocratic nose!
Carved from Marjiorie's marble slabs,
The down-turned lips
Full and sad.

"Dante Cartano" was all mama wrote,
"l913" on a safety-pinned note.
"Cartano" was the name she gave.
Was it her own?
Or the man's with whom she lay?

Artist Dante painted hell into a frame,
Where streets don't connect,
and there are no last names.
Why bestow such fame and flame?
Did the Italian womb
yieild unbearable pain?

Or did the mountain man
Lift his lover high above Milano
Where olive groves shimmer,
And poppies dress the grottos?

Perhaps the lad from Piedmont
Drew a virgin to his craggy ledge,
Promised her fertile gardens
And garlands about her head.

Or could it be Mr. Cartano died in the war?
His widow gave the babe away,
So she could sire more.

Was the maiden a German Protestant?
Her lover a Catholic and dedicated Templar?
When lust ran its course,
Their union was severed?

The mystery baby,
Why not let him be?
Dante discovered Antonette
And gained a whole new family.

Dante's son
Lives in the heart of Navara
His nose is not sharp like the Marjiorie Marble.
But Alberto's eyes,
Now there's something familiar!
Pools of luminous blue
Just like my father's! . . .
(Mr. John Daniel Cartano)

I showed Alberto color scans
Of the Americanized Cartanoes,
And their eleven piece band.
Antonio came to Pennsylvania
On a boat.
His bride was Klein--
That's about all someone wrote.
No wait!
The German Matron sang for the Kaiser.
Did her talent make up
For her husband's temper?
He lost it on the parish rector.

Together, Carolyn and Antonio sired sixteen children,
Four went "home" prematurely,
Eleven remained:
Richard, Jake, John and Dony,
Lizzie, Anna, Terace, and Louisa,
Charles, Bert, and Daniel, my grandfather.
Daniel loved Margaret and had son John.
John and Jane had seven children, of which I am one.

"Bella Famille!"
Dante's son cried.
The Milano touched my hand,
Tears gathered in his eyes.

He spoke almost no English,
I spoke a bit of French.
He pointed to me
And back to his family album again.
And then I saw her,
A Domadosola maiden,
Golden lights for a crown,
And soft full lips,
Turned slightly down.

"Ma filla! Ma filla!
She looks just like you!"
We studied one another's faces,
Searching for more clues.
Alberto's daughter, Carla
Was fetched from another part of town.
Her eyes were dark like olives,
Her lips didn't turn down.

Charts and graphs,
Stories and maybe's,
Hands flew every which way,
Memories sailed.
Internet charts and pictures
Sent from my brother David,
Came out of a folder,
Found on Alberto's back table.

While Mrs. Cartano
Served steaming espresso,
I cooled my dry throat
With apricot nectar.
Clusters of candied almonds
Were placed in our hands.
Heralding a recent wedding
Amidst the Cartano band.
Alberto's son, Andrea and his bride, Emmanuela--
A new generation, but the same old name,
Bright hope for the future,
Dante's loss, but their gain.

Amber shadows
Signaled the fleeting afternoon.
We wouldn't make it to Marjiorie
If we didn't leave soon.
Addresses were exchanged,
Pictures were taken,
We laughed and cried.
I felt a bit shaken.
And more than anything else,
I hoped we were related.
David Garvin Cartano David Garvin Cartano from Florida wrote the following letter to the Cartano Enquirer on March 20, 1999:

Greetings: I really appreciated getting the copy of the "tree" and information on the web site. I downloaded the address sections and am sending a few amended notes and a bit about our own immediate family background. We all grew up with farming backgrounds. All four of us children went to the same one-room country schoolhouse and had the same teacher for our first eight grades (although, Dick and Carol had a few early years at another site). Our grandfather (Richard Andrew Cartano) was a widely known fellow--a gentle kind man whom I never saw really angry (obviously without the famous Cartano temper). Our dad was a cattle feeder--we had several acres of cement feeding lots--and fed many hundreds of cattle each year--we grew up on horses (I rode a horse to the country school (except in the dead of Iowa winter). Our mom was an exceptional woman who was an excellent piano player--she had much energy and we all would work all day, and in the evening I'd lay around on the living room floor and listen to an hour of Chopin, Bach and all the rest of the usual classicals (she played for several state events in Des Moines). We were fortunate to have lived in a kind of classical rural community setting that has largely disappeared today. We were also fortunate to have had a foot in two kinds of American life. I personally was able to observe the change from a horse powered life ( I mean real live horses) to the internal combustion and mechanized farm life of today--two really different life styles.

Anyway, I got a degree in agronomy from Iowa State University in '57--then a MS and PhD) from Ohio State University. At Iowa State, I was working my way by waiting tables in the women's dorm and met Jo Ann Cowan whom I later married. At Ohio State, Jo got her MS, and with the help of OAS and Fulbright scholarships we spent several years in Colombia, SA. Our daughter was born in Bogota and I taught at the National University and collected data for my dissertation on new colonization in the eastern "frontier" for my dissertation. (This area is the major coke refining region during the past two decades.)

In 1966 we got an invitation to come to the University of Miami from the chairman of Sociology whom we had met in Colombia. We have lived here since that time. I've spent much of this time teaching courses and working with Masters and PhD candidates on socio-economic development in Latin American countries. A Fulbright to Brazil and having taught courses in every Central American country except Nicaragua has kept my Latin American interests up to date. Jo has been with the Dade County School system, first as special ed teacher, then as director of occupational and physical therapy programs and finally as director of teaching personnel for Dade County Schools. Our son Geoff is a geologist with the US geological survey in North Carolina, and our daughter is a psychologist living with her family in Appleton, WI.

We have just retired from our jobs after 32 years in each---but in 1980 we moved to the agricultural region of South Dade County and developed a set of commercial tropical fruit groves. We have strange fruits such as lychee, longans, atemoya and guava products which are sold to ethnic markets around the country. We are eventually going to divest ourselves of the groves also and concentrate on traveling and upgrading our tennis skills. Up to the hurricane of 1992, I managed to hang on to a state ranking in tennis, but recovering and replanting has kept me from that until recently. We also hope to visit my west coast relatives and perhaps meet more of the Cartano branches of that area. Thanks again for communicating the updates of the family tree.
David John Cartano David John Cartano is the Editor-in-Chief of the Cartano Enquirer, International Edition. He is a partner at the Los Angeles law firm of Barton, Klugman & Oetting, specializing in corporate and tax law. He graduated from the University of Washington in 1972 (B.A. English, B.A. History), Cornell Law School in 1976 (J.D.), and the University of Southern California in 1989 (MBA in Taxation). He is the author of two books, Federal and State Taxation of Limited Liability Companies and Taxation of Compensation and Benefits.

On June 2, 1964, David Cartano was awarded the most outstanding religious boy award at the 8th grade graduation ceremonies at Sacred Heart Catholic School. The most outstanding religious girl award was given to Linda Sterling. She committed suicide five years later because her live-in boyfriend overdosed on heroin. She left a note that she wanted to be with him in heaven. After that, David Cartano was the only one left to carry on the good works.

In 1972, David traveled to Northern Ireland to join the peace marches. David supported the Catholic marchers protesting against the oppression by the Protestant majority. He also joined in the nondenominational peace marches from Queens College through the City of Belfast.
Elfreida (El) Lisle Cartano Freshwater On March 24, 1927, one of El's admirers wrote a line o' type love poem to her in the Chicago Tribune. The poem compares her to another woman, and reads as follows:

Jo wore a blue cape
Swung from her shoulder;
El wore a scarlet one--
Oh, much bolder

Jo had copper hair
Like dew stained with rust
El's hair was colored
Like dark marble-dust.

Jo's feet were small
As the breadth of a dream;
El's feet . . they said . .
Were bathed in honeyed cream.

Jo could weep sedately
Whenever she tried;
El must seek a powderpuff
When she cried.

Jo clasped her small hands
At night when she prayed
But I loved Elfreida
For the songs she made . . . .

The line o' type was signed in handwriting by Donfarran with the note:

"This poem is made and inscribed for "El" who is Elfreida Cartano. With admiration and affection. Donfarran"

On December 7, 1983, Richard E. Abel wrote a letter to John Cartano stating that his mother's sister, Elfreida, was an elderly widow living on a small farm near the town of Springville, Iowa. He said that she was a charming lady.
Elizabeth (Liz) A. Watkins Cartano She was formerly married to Geoffrey David Cartano. She has remarried and now has a new last name.
Elizabeth (Lizzy) Cartano Buxler Lizzy Cartano Buxler is the third to the left, second row standing, in the historic photograph of the Anton and Caroline Klein Cartano family. She lived in Davenport Iowa. She later moved to Los Angeles, California. She had two daughters, both of whom are deceased.
Elizabeth Cavanaugh Cartano The 1905 Linn County, Iowa census shows that Elizabeth Cartano lived in Springville, Iowa.
Elmira U. Cartano The Social Security records show that Elmira Cartano died on September 22, 1990, Social Security No. 565-13-5576.
Ermelinda M. Cartano Former name: Ermelinda Caetano
Ernesto Cantos Cartano Licensed as a real estate sales person in California
Francoise Perrin Cartano Amazon/International shows that he is the the author of the publications.
Frank Cartano The 1905 Linn County, Iowa census shows that Frank Cartano lived in Springville, Iowa.
Friedericus Cartano The baptism records show that Friedericus Cartano was baptized on June 10, 1852 in Katholisch, Obermoschel, Pfalz, Bayern, Germany
Gary Edward Cartano Gary Cartano is the brother of Margaret Joann Cartano Houser.

E-mail from Gary Cartano to David Cartano on July 14, 2009:

Being only a lowly high school graduate from Cedar Rapids, Iowa and serving 4 years in the Marine Corp. I also took many courses in Drafting and Design from colleges all over. Math at U of Hawaii in Honolulu, Computer drafting from UCSD and SDSU in San Diego, getting a Private and Commercial flying license (instrument rated) at Long Beach Airport, working in the model shop of Northrop in Pico Rivera for 5 years on the wind tunnel testing and building of the B-2 Stealth Bomber. Also working many "self-employed" jobs I created myself: Cars by Cartano in Santa Fe Springs, CA in the 80's. and Cartano Drafting and Design for the last 20 years in San Diego County.

As for hobbies I have always loved to build models, but my one true love was singing. For the past 45 years 1964 to today, I have sung with Barbershop choruses and quartets from all over the country. My greatest achievement being; winning the gold medal in the 1990 International Chorus competition in San Francisco with the Masters of Harmony from Santa Fe Springs. We had 110 men on stage in the Cow Palace that year. It was unforgettable, along with many of the other moments I cherish from my 67 years of LIFE. I have cut trees, rebuilt houses and cars, landscaped, and worked in warehouses.

I can only think of one thing I would trade it all for and money has nothing to do with it. I would loved to have been a Marine jet fighter pilot. It almost happened once in the Marines, but I wore glasses and at the time, they wouldn't let me, for that reason, even though I passed all the tests to get into the "Cadet program". I was heartbroken. At 18, that was what I wanted to do more than anything else with my life. It wasn't to be.

I live retire on SS with my wife Lucy (who is still working at UCSD), in a "Manufactured Home" in a trailer park called Rancho Escondido (two club houses and two swimming pools) in Escondido, CA (trailer trash). I have an SUV, but I love running around the freeways on my motorcycle. Lucy drives a Prius. We both still sing with our choruses and quartets.
Geoffrey David Cartano Geoffrey Cartano graduated from Knox College.

E-mail from Geoffrey Cartano to Gary Cartano on July 14, 2009:

My name is Geoff Cartano and I live in Raleigh, NC. I am on the California Cartano email distribution list and I read your email this AM. I was especially interested in you being a 'high school graduate from Cedar Rapids'. My dad, Dave Cartano, residing Fla. and NC, born 1935, was raised on a farm outside of Cedar Rapids and I wonder if you know him. The family stories he tells sometimes mention 'Honest' John (my great, great uncle). My grandfather was Wilbur and he was married to Blanche.

I saw your request on others and their lives so here's my brief one. I grew up in Miami where I swam competitively for 14 yrs and player water polo for 9 years and headed back to the Midwest for college (Knox College, Galesburg, Il.). I received a BS in Geology in 1984. I returned to Miami after college and bopped around for a few years as a cook/chef in the restaurant industry. One day in 1988, I opened the White Pages and called the USGS office in Miami. They invited me in for an interview and I was hired on immediately. Since then I have been with the USGS, Water Resources Division in Miami, Orlando and now Raleigh. I plan to stay on with the USGS until I retire which will be in approximately 14 years.

Unfortunately I know very little of the California Cartano's, except for my uncle Dick in Sacramento. That why I stay on David Cartano's distribution list, I enjoy the exchange of emails that occasionally occur.
Guy Ronald Cartano He was a salesman for wholesale hardware. The Social Security records show that Guy Cartano died in December 1976, Social Security No. 480-40-8629.
Ivan James Cartano Robert McEnulty, rmcenulty1@austin.rr.com, states that he believes that Ivan James Cartana is really Ivan James Cartano, and provided the following information regarding Ivan:

Birth data from 1920 Colorado Census index. On November 24, 1936 when Ivan enrolled in Social Security, he was living in Arvada Colorado and was employed by The Stites Comerical Oil Co,732 West 43rd Ave Denver Colorado. Ivan's parents were Charles Cartana and Elizabeth Kavanaugh. This data was taken from his Social Security enrollment application.

Ivan was married to Ota Mae Breeding prior to his marriage to Helen Burns.

Ivan's family moved from Linn County Iowa to Denver between 1900 and 1910 and are listed as Chas Carteno family in Denver 7th ward 1910 census. They were Chas, Elizabeth, Lillian, Ivan, and Frank. Charles,Elizabeth and Frank were back in Linn County as Cartana in the 1920 census. I speculate that Lillian married in Colorado before the family went back to Linn county. Ivan must have returned with the family to Iowa and joined the army from Iowa when WW1 broke out. He may have married Ota Mae about 1918-19 in Oklahoma while still in the army. In 1920, he was living in Denver with his brother in law Harry Rupp and his sister Lillian Rupp. He declared himself as single in the 1920 Denver census. Ota Mae was living in Tulsa, Oklahoma, working as a stenographer and declaring herself single in the Tulsa 1920 census. So there is uncertainy as to when they married. Anyway they were both claiming divorced in the 1930 Colorado Census.

The 1905 Linn County, Iowa census shows that Ivan Cartano lived in Springville, Iowa.

The 1900 Federal Census show Ivan J. Cartano with parents as Charles and Elizabeth

1900 Federal Census

http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=1900usfedcen&indiv=try&h=14517118

Name:
Ivan J Cartano

Home in 1900:
Brown, Linn, Iowa

Age:
2

Birth Date:
Apris 1898

Birthplace:
Iowa

Race:
White

Ethnicity:
American

Gender:
Male

Relationship to head-of-house:
Son

Father's Name:
Charles

Father's Birthplace:
Pennsylvania

Mother's Name:
Elizabeth

Mother's Birthplace:
Wisconsin

Marital Status:
Single

Residence :
Springville Town, Linn, Iowa

Household Members:
Name
Age

Charles Cartano
42

Elizabeth Cartano
41

Willie Cartano
21

Bessie E. Cartano
15

Jessie M. Cartano
13

Mabel C. Cartano
11

Anna Cartano
9

Lillie B. Cartano
6

Ivan J Cartano
2

These data are from Rose Hills Memorial Park Cemetery located in Whittier CA.

CARTANA, IVAN JAMES

Date Of Death: Sunday, September 02, 1951
Burial Property Name: Oak Lawn
Burial Section: 1
Burial Lot: 601
Grave/Niche: 2
Entrance Gate: 14

CARTANA, HELEN M.

Date Of Death: Wednesday, December 01, 1993
Burial Property Name: Oak Lawn
Burial Section: 1
Burial Lot: 601
Grave/Niche: 3
Entrance Gate: 14

The 1895 Linn County Iowa State census shows a child Mary age 14 between Willie & Bessie. I show Frank born in 1902. Evidently the family moved to Denver between 1905 & 1910.
Jacob (Jake) Cartano Jake Cartano is on the far right, first row sitting, in the historic photograph of the Anton and Caroline Klein Cartano family. He was a barber in Ireton, Iowa. He had two daughters.
Jane Bronson Cartano Jane Cartano was born in Las Cruces, New Mexico. She lived in a house now considered an historic building at 409 Las Cruces Ave, Las Cruces, New Mexico.

She received a degree in home economics from the University of New Mexico and a Masters Degree in Nutrition from Iowa State University. Some sample passages from her Masters thesis on Vitamin C requirements for college women are as follows:

"Simultaneous vitamin C determinations were made on two samples of blood, one analysis by the photoelectric macro technique and one by the visual micro procedure.

"The titration values were read in the photoelectric colorimeter. An excess of dye was added to a one-milliliter aliquot of urine. A correction for color and turbidity in urine was made by decolorizing the excess of dye in the sample after the timed readings had been completed. A final decolorized reading was obtained in the colorimeter and this value was subtracted from each of the original readings. Urinary readings were further corrected for the amount of dye necessary to bring an equivalent of the amount of extracting acid or preservative in a sample to the same end point. This value, termed a blank, was obtained by reading in the photoelectric colimeter the decolorization of dye due to a one-milliliter aliquot containing a representative proportion of metaphosphoric acid and 8-hydroxy-quinoline as in the urine sample. The reducing value of urine alone was calculated by subtracting the blank reading from the original reading minus the decolorized reading."

The rest of the Masters thesis is just as exciting and may be ordered through the Memorabilia section of this Web site.

Jane Cartano's son, David, used to distress her by constantly comparing her home economics and nutrition courses to basket weaving. David told her the story about the student who wanted an easy A at the University, and decided to sign up for a course in Basket Weaving 101. The student got in a class with 27 Navajo Indians and flunked the course.

After graduating from the University of Iowa, Jane Cartano worked as a nutritionist for the Washington State Dairy Council. She married John Cartano and was the mother of seven children. The dramatic story about her marriage to John Cartano is discussed below in the personal information section for John Cartano.

John Cartano wrote the following poem about Jane Cartano:

Jane’s Qualities – From A to Z

A able, accommodating, adorable, appreciative
B beautiful, busy
C cheerful, Christian, coquettish, cooperative, courteous, courageous, capable, charming, caring, cleanly, committed, contented
D dedicated, determined, desirable, domestic, delightful, decent, diligent
E eager, energetic, elegant, educated, enthusiastic, efficient
F faithful, fair, friendly, fore-bearing, forgiving, fruitful
G generous, gentle, grateful, God-loving
H happy, helpful, honest, hopeful
I idealistic, industrious, irresistible, inspiring
J joyful
K kind
L loving, loyal
M merry, magnanimous, merciful
N non-critical, non-judgmental, non-complaining
O optimistic, open-minded
P patient, pretty, persevering, pure, prayerful
Q quick, qualified
R responsible, reliable, resourceful, reverent
S sweet, sincere, spiritual, sacrificing, serene
T tireless, thoughtful, trustworthy, tolerant, truthful
U understanding, unusual, unselfish
V virtuous
W winsome, wise, wonderful, willing
X “X-ceptional”, “X-quisite
Y youthful
Z zealous

Jane Cartano died on May 1, 2005 in Bellevue Washington. Memorial services were held for her and her family home in Bellevue. The program for the memorial services read as follows:

In Celebration of Jane Bronson Cartano
February 5, 1921-May 1, 2005

Yea, thou I walk through the valley of the shadow of death, I will fear no evil: for thou art with me, thy rod and thy staff they comfort me.
Psalms 23:4.

Celebrant: Father Richard Gallagher

Opening Hymn: Angela Aichinger

Welcome

First Reading: Helene Marcelia
Isaiah 25:6-9

Reader: The Word of the Lord
All: Thanks be to God.

Responsorial Psalm: Jill Cartano

All: The Lord is my shepherd;
there is nothing I shall want.

The Lord is my shepherd; I shall not want.
In verdant pastures he gives me repose;
Beside restful waters he leads me;
he refreshes my soul.
He guides me in right paths
for his name's sake.

All: The Lord is my shepherd;
there is nothing I shall want.

Even though I walk in the dark valley
I fear no evil; for you are at my side
With your rod and your staff
that give me courage.

All: The Lord is my shepherd;
there is nothing I shall want.

You spread the table before me
in the sight of my foes;
You anoint my head with oil;
my cup overflows.

All: The Lord is my shepherd;
there is nothing I shall want.

Only goodness and kindness follow me
all the days of my life;
And I shall dwell in the house of the Lord
for years to come.

Second Reading: David Gascoigne
Matthew 25:34-40

Reader: The Word of the Lord
All: Thanks be to God.

Gospel: Father Gallagher

Prayers of the Faithful:
Jane and Julie Hewes

Bringing up the Gifts:

Katie and Jack Savard
Geena and John Marcelia

Reflections

Song:
Angela Aichinger and David Gascoigne

Blessing and Dismissal

A mother is the truest friend we have, when trials, heavy and sudden, fall upon us; when adversity takes the place of prosperity; when friends who rejoice with us in our sunshine, desert us when troubles thicken around us, still will she cling to us, and endeavor by her kind precepts and counsels to dissipate the clouds of darkness, and cause peace to return to our hearts.

Washington Irving

____________________________________

Remarks given by Julie Cartano Rourke at the Memorial Service for Jane Bronson Cartano (2/5/1927 to 5/1/2005).

When I think of Mom, there are so many memories that come into my mind, flashbacks from the past. I like to think of her as she was, not just in the past few years as she suffered from Parkinson’s, but of the person she was for the 56 years that I was privileged to have her as my mother.

I don’t think I ever truly appreciated what an amazing woman she was until I had a family of my own. Since raising a family, and a small one at that, I have asked myself so many times, HOW DID SHE DO IT? HOW DID SHE DO IT SO WELL?

When I was little, she and Dad raised vegetables on the property that is now the Hoverter’s and she would bring the harvest home to the dinner table. As her family grew, she would shuck ears of corn , string beans, section grapefruit, hull strawberries, pit cherries, can fruit, and make jam – all in huge quantities. We had a different salad every night it seemed. It was all made from “scratch,” except for the occasional cake mix, which Grandma disapproved of. She would pack the picnic basket during the summer with food for 8 to 10 people, and help Dad carry it to the beach. How did she prepare such quantities every night, do it so well, and with so many little ones underfoot?

The house was always clean, always straightened up. Even when there were 10 of us in the house with Grandma, the living room always looked ready for company. I remember coming into the house shortly before she moved to Sunrise to find her pushing the mop across the kitchen floor while holding onto her walker.

Remember all of our wonderful trips? I didn’t appreciate it at the time, but she would help us all shop for new outfits for the trips, pack for all of us, and then wash our clothes out each night when we traveled so we would have fresh shirts, socks and underwear the next day.

We took up skiing when I was 9 years old – I never realized at the time that she had to dress 3 children in ski clothes, pack our lunches and see that 2 younger children had a sitter for the day! How did she even have the strength to ride the rope tow?

She hated to shop, but she always had a beautiful dress ready for the many occasions that she went out with Dad. I especially remember her bubble skirt, her mink stole, her Mikimoto pearls, her Indian jewelry and fiesta skirt with the little people on it from New Mexico. Even when she lived at Sunrise, she liked to pick out her clothes each day. She cared about her hair, even at the end! She was a lady.

She never gossiped. I remember my first experience with having long conversations with a friend on the phone in about the third grade. She overheard me gossiping about someone at school, and she would not allow it. When we would “tattle” on someone’s behavior in the family, she never seemed to take sides, but would help us work out our differences.

She loved each one of her children unconditionally. She didn’t have favorites. She always made you feel special because she actually felt that way. She was so thrilled with the arrival of each new baby. She would tell us how beautiful and innocent a new baby was. She treated each one of her children as a gift from God.

How did she live through 7 teenagers? She had teenagers in the house for 18 years, and I certainly remember that we were not always easy to get along with. Later, she made it a point never to interfere with our choices of mates, and welcomed each spouse into the family with open arms. She never interfered with our marriages either, however, she advised us to see how a person treated their parents before deciding to get married, because that was how they would treat us later. That was good advice.

She was very close to her parents. I was about five and we were in Birch Bay. I remember how upset she was to get the call from New Mexico that her father had suffered a heart attack. She hated having her parents live so far away when they needed help, and she was so happy to have them move to Mercer Island so that she could look after them. She helped Grandma furnish her new apartment, took her to her hair appointments, helped her find Bridge partners, and brought her to the house every night for dinner for about 10 years after Granddad passed away. She missed her mother terribly when she died.

Her strong faith was central to her life. She always tried to practice the “Christian Virtues,” as Dad called them, although I think they just came naturally to her. She insisted that we never miss Sunday Mass, even when we were on a trip. We went to Mass in Hawaii, in Germany, and in Indonesia. We all went to Sacred Heart School , and we always ate fish on Friday when that was the rule. In later years, Mom and Dad’s car could be found parked in one of the handicapped spots in front of Sacred Heart every single Sunday. She even had Dad wheel her upstairs each week for Mass at Sunrise.

She was so brave in dealing with her illnesses. She never complained. She always said was “getting better.” I had to take her to the emergency room more than once after she these periods of “getting better.” In fact, she went around for almost year with a broken hip, never complaining about the pain, until I finally dragged her to the doctor and demanded an x-ray which showed the break. She was probably the only resident at Sunrise who never complained to the staff, even though she certainly had plenty to complain about. She was so loved by all the staff because she always had a smile for them and a whisper of appreciation for their care. Jasbir said that Mom would always ask HER how SHE was doing, never complaining about her own condition.
.
As I look around today, I see Mom’s legacy – her family – my father who enjoyed 58 years happy years marriage with her, my six brothers and sisters, my sister- and brothers- in-law, my nieces and nephews, my husband, and my two sons. After all these years, we’re still gathering here together as a family in her living room and at her beach, still enjoying each other’s company.

Mom’s legacy is all around us because I think she has left a little bit of her in each one of us.

____________________________

The Seattle Times published the following obituary for Jane Cartano on May 7, 2005:

Jane Bronson Cartano died May 1, 2005 in Bellevue at the age of 84 after a long illness with Parkinson’s.

She is survived by her husband of 58 years, John Daniel Cartano; their 7 children, Julie Rourke (Robert) of Bellevue, WA, David Cartano of Los Angeles, CA, Robert Cartano (Maureen) of Seattle, WA, Anna Gascoigne (Robert) of Lynnwood, WA, Helene Marcelia (Jeffrey) of Bellevue, WA, Margaret Hewes (Richard) of Portland, ME , and Joan Savard (Steven) of Bellevue, WA. She had 13 grandchildren, Kyle and Tyler Rourke, Joe and Jill Cartano, Angela Aichinger, Alicia Lydick, David Gascoigne, Geena and John Marcelia, Jane and Julie Hewes, and Katie and Jack Savard. She also had three great-grandchildren, Daniel, Evelyn and Elaina Aichinger. She was preceded in death by her sister, Louise Bulman of Maryland.

Jane was born on February 5, 1921 in Las Cruces, New Mexico to Florence Delaney Bronson and David Edgeworth Bronson. Her father was the Editor of the Las Cruces Sun News. She graduated from Loretto Academy in Las Cruces in 1938, and went on to graduate with honors with a Bachelor of Science in Home Economics from New Mexico State in 1942. During her college years she held various campus leadership positions, had the lead in two plays and was a member of Zeta Tau Alpha Sorority. She earned a Masters of Science degree in Nutrition from Iowa State University in 1944.

A position as Chief Nutritionist for the Washington State Dairy Council brought Jane to Seattle where she soon met local attorney John Cartano. After a whirlwind courtship, they married in Las Cruces, NM on November 1, 1946, and settled in Bellevue to start their family.

Jane was active in the East Lake Washington Home Economists, the Dr. James B. Eagleson Guild of Childrens Hospital and Medical Center, the Seattle Tennis Club, and supported her husband John’s many political and civic activities. She and John enjoyed dancing with the Arcadian Dance Club. She volunteered for a number of years to bring bread from a local Bellevue bakery every week to the Union Gospel Mission in Seattle.

Jane was a very devout Catholic and an active parishioner of Sacred Heart Church in Bellevue, WA. All seven of her children graduated from Sacred Heart School.

She enjoyed playing golf, skiing with her family, gardening and traveling all over the world. However, her greatest passion was cooking delicious meals for her family and friends. As a special tribute, her daughter, Margaret Hewes has compiled a cookbook entitled, Just Like Mother’s, featuring Jane’s memorable recipes for her delicious cooking.

Jane spent her last afternoon in the company of her husband and several of her children and grandchildren. She was even treated to a visit to a nearby park. She faced her 20 year struggle with Parkinson’s with dignity, courage and a positive attitude. She derived great strength from her Catholic faith and the loving support of her husband and family. She was known by all as a very caring individual who never complained and always had a kind word for everyone she knew.

The family will hold a private memorial service at a later date. Remembrances may be made to the American Parkinson Disease Association, Washington State Chapter, PO Box 75169, Seattle, WA 98725-0169.

Jane Bronson Cartano
Born Las Cruces, New Mexico 2/5/1921
Baptized "Mary Jane" Bronson, Catholic
Died Bellevue, Washington 5/1/2005

Marriage to John D. Cartano 11/1/1946 in Las Cruces, New Mexico
Education: Loretto Academy, Las Cruces, NM; New Mexico State University, BS in Home Economics; Iowa State University, MS in Nutrition (text at Cartano.com); Employment: Head Home Economist for Washington State Dairy Council, approx. 1946-48.

Parents:
David Edgeworth Bronson, born Mazomanie, Wisconsin 1/2/1895, died 29 Dec
2006 Mercer Island, WA; Publisher of Las Cruces Sun newspaper, Las Cruces, New Mexico.
Florence Delaney Bronson, born 6/27/1889 Bristol, South Dakota; died 17 Aug
1973 Mercer Island, WA. Home Economics teacher at Stout Institute, now University of Wisconsin.
1 sibling: Louise Bronson Bulman, born 2/7/1924 Las Cruces, NM, died 15 Sep
2002 Maryland, married John S. "Jack" Bulman, Las Cruces, NM, died 24 May 2004, Maryland.
John S. "Jack" Bulman born 17 Jul 1917 Greenfield, MA; died 24 May 2004 Louise & Jack's children: Patricia, Michael, Teresa, Meg, Steven, John, all still living.
Janelle Marie Cartano Lauer E-mail from Gary Cartano to Julie Cartano Rourke:

Re: Janelle Marie Cartano Lauer

Janelle is my brother Johnnie's grand daughter. Erma was Johnnie's first wife and Jeffery is Johnnie and Erma's Son. Janelle is a very talented musician an singing artist in Cedar Rapids. I have a CD that my sister sent me after our trip up to Northern CA to Christian's wedding. We talked of her and I was very interested in meeting her. My problem was that I didn't have her e-mail address and neither of my sisters use a computer.
Jennifer (Jennie) Mae Campbell Cartano The obituary in the local newspaper for J. R. Campbell (the father of Jennie) stated that Jennie grew up in a family of seven children, three girls and four boys. Her parents were John Russell Campbell and Olive Magee. John Campbell died on October 21, 1916. The obituary states that Jennie died two years before that.

Jennie married Richard Andrew Cartano and had three children. Her husband carried on the family with the help of a housekeeper after her early death. He never remarried.
Jessie Mae Cartano Waln Jessie Cartano was one of his youngest children of Charles Cartano. She grew up in Iowa where she married. The 1905 Linn County, Iowa census shows that Jessie lived in Springville, Iowa. She was an excellent teacher and school principal in Iowa.

The local newspaper gave the following obituary for Jessie on her death:

"Jessie Waln, East Iowa Teacher, Dies

"Jessie Cartano Waln, widow of John Waln, 1637 Sixth Street NW, died Sunday following a brief illness. Born May 31, 1887 at Springville, she had been a resident of Marion and Cedar Rapids since 1956.

"Surviving are three sisters, Bessie Peterson of Council Bluffs, Lillian Rupp of Denver, and Marie Kerns of Cedar Rapids.

"Mrs. Waln was a teacher in the Cedar Rapids area over 40 years, having taught in rural schools and in grade schools at Tipton, Marengo, Reinbeck, Traer and at Taylor school in Cedar Rapids. Her last 24 years of teaching were spent in West Liberty Elementary school. She also taught a year in Alaska. Mrs. Waln was a member of the Presbyterian church at Springville, a member of Love Chapter OES at Springville, the Cary club and Women's club of Marion and the Iowa Teachers Assn.
Jo Ann Cartano Jo Ann Cartano is a teacher. She is married to David Garvin Cartano who was a professor in sociology at the University of Miami.
Jo Ann Cowan Cartano See discussion of her personal life in the section on her husband, David Garvin Cartano.
Joan Cartano Savard Joan Cartano Savard was the youngest of seven children of Jane and John Cartano. She graduated from the University of Washington and received an MBA from the University of Denver. She was the President of her sorority. She and her husband, Steve, are living in Bellevue, Washington. Steve is working as a consultant in IT.
John (Honest John) Guy Cartano John Cartano is on the far left, second row standing, in the historic photograph of the Anton and Caroline Klein Cartano family. He worked in a billiard parlor in Anamosa, Iowa. He had one son.

Following is Honest John Cartano's baptismal record from St. John the Baptist Catholic Church, Schuylkill County (Pottsville area), PA in 1852. I have noted the web address for this material which is quoted below:

http://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/pa/schuylkill/church/stjohns002.txt

"Church Records: Some Marriage, Baptism and Death Records from St. John the Bapist Catholic Church between 1845-1860, Schuylkill county … Translated into English and same order: Birthdate; Baptism; Name of infant; Name and place of Origin of Parents and Village now; Name of grandfather; Name with place of Origin of Godparents; ...The pastor in each case except two marked ^ was Daniel Oberholzer...
[skipped to...]
1852...
Sept 18 Oct 10 Joannes Antonius Cartano ex Bavaria et Carolina nata Klein ex Borussia----Grossader---; Joannes; Joannes Herz ex Bavaria and Josephina Pruh ex Baden".

------------------------
Note from Julie Cartano Rourke: the interesting thing here is that Joannes, a Latinized form of John because these records were in Latin at the Catholic Church, is not only listed as the infant Honest John's name, but also as the name of his GRANDFATHER, who would be Anton Cartano's father! I had not known the name of Anton's father to this point. Of course we don't know if he was named "John" in Germany, or some other German version of John.
John Daniel Cartano John Cartano was born in Seattle, Washington. He graduated from Harvard Law School. He was an attorney and senior partner in the Seattle law firm of Cartano, Botzer and Chapman, President of the Seattle Chamber of Commerce, and father of seven children.

John's father wanted him to become a lawyer. John did not want to become a lawyer until his father told John that he could decide for himself what he wanted to be. His father told him that he could go to any law school, and that he would pay for it if John worked his way through the University of Washington. John paid his way through the University of Washington. He sold cold during the middle of the summer. He tried to sell real estate. He worked four years as a bookkeeper and relief bank teller at Peoples Bank on second and Main Street in Seattle, Washington. A relief bank teller is a person who works after hours when other people are sick or absent. He stayed out of school a year after graduation from the University of Washington in order to make it easier for his father to pay for law school. This was the beginning of 1929 when there was the severe depression. During that one-year period, he read books at the public library in Seattle and completed a program of self study.

He went to Harvard Law School in August 1931. He was able to go with Dan Shanahan, a University of Washington graduate, who was going to Harvard business school. Dan told John did he could ride with him in his old Chevrolet. It went only 35 mph without overheating. On his way back East, they slept in sleeping bags on the banks of the Mississippi River. John also stayed without charge in his Sigma Chi fraternity houses whenever he could find them. John returned with Dan in June 1934, toeing a new truck for his father who was an auto dealer. They ran the truck off the wrote on one occasion, and not car overheated on another occasion. The radiator overheated because they went up the Rocky Mountains without water in the radiator. The car was seriously damaged because of the radiator problem, and Dan's father made a " present" of the unsalable car to his wife, Dan's mother.

John worked during the summers while at Harvard Law School in order to earn additional money. During the summer after his first year in law school, which was 1932, he worked on Mrs. Beckwirth's 10 acre farm in Sebago, Maine. He hoed potatoes and corn, scrubed floors and made beds. During the next summer, he was a camp counselor for 10 campers. Mrs. Beckwirth bought a Model T Ford for $25 which he used to bring campers to lakes and ponds in Maine. They stayed at the farm at night. During the third summer, John left Harvard Law School and came home to Seattle.

During World War II, John Cartano served as the naval commander of a destroyer escort that was part of the fleet leading the invasion of Japan. Julie Cartano Rourke has a copy of a letter to John Cartano from J.F. Shafroth, Rear Admiral, U.S. Navy, Deputy Commander South Pacific Area and South Pacific Force, awarding Lieutenant J. D. Cartano, United States Naval Reserve, the Navy and Marine Corps Medal for Heroism. The letter stated that John Cartano was being cited for service as follows:

"For heroism displayed in the rescue of approximately thirty-five survivors from a burning transport which had been subjected to an enemy serial attach in the Solomon Islands area on August 13, 1943. Lieutenant CARTANO, as the Commanding Officer of a small craft, went promptly to the rescue of survivors from the stricken ship which at the time was exploding
and burning violently. His efficient conduct of rescue operations resulted in saving the lives of many wounded men who would undoubtedly have been lost but for his prompt and fearless action. His conduct was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service."

Margaret Cartano Hewes transcribed the radio broadcast below from a promotional advertisement that was played nationally during World War II to recruit workers to build and rehabilitate vessels in the shipyards and to bolster national commitment to World War II. Other military personnel were featured on similar broadcasts.

~ Radio Special ~

"For every American's war . . ."

The John Cartano Story

In this dramatic story, which you hear James tell, Bethlehem Steel, builders of ships for victory, brings you a message, which we cannot afford to forget.

He was always a great sports fan. He loved baseball, football and basketball, and played a darn good game of golf and tennis. His dad loved these games, too, and they played a lot together, all this was back in their hometown of Seattle Washington.

By the way, we're talking about John D. Cartano of that city. John did a good job of playing the game of life, too. He graduated from both high school and college with honors. Then he became a successful practicing attorney in a Seattle law firm. Finally, he decided to get into the biggest game that's being played right now, the game of war to victory.

He's now Lieutenant John D. Cartano of the United States Navy. The U.S.S. John Penn, a transport cargo ship, was just off Guadal Canal. It was August 13, 1943, and she was bringing to a large troop fighting in the Solomon's area a much-needed cargo of ammunition.

Suddenly out of the sky screamed a formation of Jap torpedo planes. One enemy plane put her fish right through the engine room of the John Penn. A terrific explosion tore a great hole in the vessel and almost immediately she was a blazing popping inferno. Nearby lying off Guadal Canal was an army patrol craft, the USS APC 25. Her commanding officer, Navy Lieutenant John D. Cartano, saw what was happening to the helpless transport. While the radio communications systems in the vicinity crackled with various opinions on what should be done, he had already made up his mind. In those radio contacts, they were agreeing that it would be too dangerous for other vessels to approach the burning exploding USS Penn.

It appeared obvious that there was little chance of saving anyone. The danger of getting anywhere near that exploding inferno was great. But Lt. Cartano and his small craft was already proceeding at full speed toward the quickly sinking cargo ship.

The USS Penn went down twenty minutes after the torpedo struck. The sea around the sinking ship was aflame with burning oil. But Lt. Cartano brought his small craft in as close as he dared and began the job of picking up survivors. He realized he would have to work fast.

Some of the men in the water had on life jackets, but others, and among them were many wounded, had none. Lt. Cartano got search, rescue, and first aid parties into action immediately. He and his men worked hard, and they worked fast, and later when they counted the survivors, they found Lt. Cartano's little patrol craft had pulled out 33 men. The USS Penn's Capt. Roberts suffering from a bad shoulder and burns turned up among the survivors, too. The rescued were given pajamas and coveralls for something to wear, and as they lined up on the beach for roll call to check the missing, another alarm sounded. The Jap planes were coming again and Lt. Cartano's rescue had been effective just in time.

For his courageous action and splendid initiative, Lt. Cartano was awarded the Navy and Marine Corps Medal. Yes, it's men like Lt. Cartano who are showing what courage and initiative can accomplish in the conduct of this war, but without ships this war would be impossible. Ships of all kinds are urgently needed to carry a live cargo and to fight the enemy. Men are needed now with or without shipyard experience at the Hobocan Yard of Bethlehem Steel Company to repair, recondition and convert ships required for war
service.

Here is your chance to get directly behind our boys. Men not in essential industry, also veterans or those classified as 4F or otherwise draft deferred, can learn a technical trade that pays while learning."
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

One of the most interesting stories concerning John Cartano was his courtship of Jane Bronson and his wedding proposal to her three weeks after they met. John Cartano was 37 years old that time and Jane was 25 years old. Jane explained that "we were more mature at that age and knew what we wanted, so it was not like we were making a quick decision." Here are all the details:

Jane Bronson received her master's degree in nutrition at Iowa State University. Her master's thesis concerned vitamin C requirements for college women. Her conclusion was that active college women need more vitamin C than inactive women. Her master's thesis was part of a larger study on vitamin requirements for college women.

After graduating, she accepted a job as a nutritionist with the Washington State Dairy Council in Seattle. The Dairy Council also had offices in Tacoma and Spokane, Washington. Jane would often make trips to the other offices and give talks to schools, hospitals, nurses and various other organizations.

She lived the first six months after graduation in a rooming house in East Seattle. Mrs. McEachern rented the room to her. She was a domineering woman and a good cook.

Jane then moved to a rental duplex in Seattle with two other girls, Mable Mullikin and Marie Hicks. Mable was a home economist for Centennial Flouring Mills. She taught at the University of Washington and was previously a home economist and teacher in Idaho. Marie was a nurse for new babies in hospitals. Jane met Mable through Mrs. Hanney who hired her for the Dairy Council. It was right after the War when there was inadequate housing. The Dairy Council had to arrange housing for many of their employees. Jane lived on one side of duplex with the two other girls. Mable traveled all over the state for Centennial. She often went to Eastern Washington. Jane did not have a car, but was sometimes able to combine her trips with Mable's trips when Mable traveled to Eastern Washington.

Telephones were very hard to get at that time. The three girls put in their order, but had to wait their turn. While the girls were gone on a trip, the telephone company came by to install the telephone. The owner prevented the telephone company from installing the telephone because the owner had not ordered it. Mable was furious. She decided that it was time to buy a house. She had enough money for a downpayment. But when they looked in the classified ads, the houses were too expensive and not many houses were available at that time. Jane saw a section in the classified ads on house boats. She did not know what a house boat was. But she noticed that the prices for house boats were less than for regular houses. She asked Mable whether she had ever thought about buying a house boat. They went out to see one of the house boats on Lake Washington the next day. The house boat had three bedrooms. Mable decided to buy the house boat immediately. The three girls moved into a house boat.

The roommates often entertained at the houseboat. Jane had a tea for the head of the home economics department of the University of Washington at the house.

Howard and Ruth Laurent lived across the boardwalk in another house boad with their child. Howard had been in the Navy with John Cartano. Howard was John's superior officer on a destroyer escort during World War II. John had helped him buy a house boat after the War. Howard told John he knew of a girl in the house boat next door whom he wanted John to meet. Howard tried to arrange a date, but Jane already had a date on that day. He tried to arrange another date for John, but John could not go at that time because he had to travel to California on business for Dr. Wall regarding a patent matter. John and Jane were both available on the third date arranged by Howard, Wednesday, May 15, 1946.

John was staying at the Monk's Club. He walked to the house boat since he did not have a car. John got to Howard's house boat first. He was reading the newspaper "when in walked an angel, smiling." Jane brought guacamole. They ate cracked crab for dinner. Howard played the violin or some other musical instrument. That gave John a chance to dance with Jane and to put his arms around her. They both had a wonderful time at the party. Howard got out a little hockey board, and they played hockey. After dinner, Jane and John talked and talked. Howard went to bed while Jane and John sat on the davenport and talked until about two or three in the morning. Finally, John decided it was time to leave, but not before getting another date with Jane. He asked her out the next Saturday, but Jane already had another date. So he asked her out on Friday for dinner at the China Pheasant nightclub.

Ruth drove John home at about 3 a.m. in the morning to the Monk's Club. John's roommate heard him whistling the next day and said to him, "Roomie, you must be in love."

After dinner at the China Pheasant nightclub the next Friday, Jane and John parked until three or four in the morning. From then on, John had a series of dates with Jane. After only a few dates, he started asking Jane about religion and many other personal things. He wrote everything down about the dates and Jane in his diary and scrap book.

John told Jane that he would be on vacation for three weeks, but did not know where he was going. Jane said that he could come with him to Las Cruces if he wanted. She did not expect him to say yes. The next day, Thursday, John bought a plane ticket to Las Cruces and picked up the ticket on Saturday. He proposed to Jane three weeks later.

John's plane from Los Angeles to Las Cruces was delayed in Los Angeles, so he missed the connection to El Paso. John asked the officer on the plane to hold up the connecting flight to El Paso. The officer said he would, but the flight was not held up. Jane and her father showed up at the airport to meet John, but he was not on the plane. He did not show up on two more planes from Los Angeles. Her father, David Bronson, had taken Jane and her sister, Louise, to Juarez for dinner, and then went to the airport to wait for John. When John did not show up on the first several planes, Jane's father said that he would wait for one more plane only, but that would be it and he would not wait any longer. Fortunately, John showed up on the next plane. Otherwise, it would have been very difficult for John to get from El Paso to Las Cruces were Jane lived. The plane got in near midnight. Jane's father drove John to a hotel called the Amador. It was a picturesque Spanish style hotel. John showed up next morning for breakfast at Jane's house.

All the family members in Las Cruces liked John. John had to leave Las Cruces a week early because Jane's boyfriend, Slim, was coming to visit her for a week in Las Cruces. Slim was a navy lieutenant from Canada. Jane, John and Jane's sister, Louise, went to the airport to meet Slim. John told Slim that he would do everything he could to undermine him. Slim had brought a bottle of Scotch to give to Jane's father. The bottle had broken and spilled on his belongings in the suitcase. That night, the four went dancing at a nightclub in Juarez across the border. John encouraged Louise to dance with Slim so that John could dance with Jane. John promised to pay Louise ten dollars to take Slim home first. Slim was upset. It was almost the year later before John paid Louise the ten dollars after she reminded him.

John thanked Jane's father for his hospitality when he left Las Cruces. The father told John that he was getting a good girl, but John said that he was not sure he was getting her.

After his first proposal to Jane, Jane did not immediately say yes because she had just met John three weeks before. John told her that he would not propose to her more than once a week from then on. Jane told John she was trying to think of reasons that she would not like him, but could not think of any.

After Jane returned to Seattle, she started going out steady with John. On one date, Jane and John went to Bainbridge Island to the home of a prominent attorney from Seattle. They spent the weekend with them. Some girls came into the house to say that they had seen Jane and John kissing in a boat on the water.

The next week, Jane had lunch with Francis Wiley. She was the head of the Tacoma office where Jane worked. There was one other girl who came to lunch. They both asked Jane about John. Jane started telling them all of the good things about John. While she was doing so, she realized how she really felt about John. She wondered why she was telling them and not John. After lunch, she called John at his office and asked to meet him after work. They met at a nice bar at the Olympic Hotel. John proposed to Jane again and she said yes. They shook hands and John said, "That's a deal." They could not kiss since they were in a public place. Jane then had to return home since it was house cleaning night at the house boat. The two were engaged on July 9.

Jane and John set a date for the marriage in Las Cruces, New Mexico. John was not a Catholic, so they had to get married in the rectory of the church. As the priest was putting on his vestments in the rectory, he told Jane and John that the service would start when he knocked on the wall. He knocked on the wall to show them. The organ player heard the knock and started playing the organ. The wedding started before the priest was dressed and ready.

There was a reception at the Las Cruces Country Club. About 200 people attended. Jane's father lent John his car. They took the car on a one-month honeymoon to Mexico. They traveled all over Mexico and then came back to Seattle.

Before they married, John called Jane from his office. He told her that they had two choices for an apartment to live in. It was hard to find apartments after the War. There was one apartment in East Seattle and another one-room apartment over a double garage on Evergreen Point in Bellevue, Washington. Jane knew a bookkeeper who lived in Bellevue. She had previously gone out to see her in Bellevue and had walked through Beaux Arts Village in Bellevue. She knew Bellevue was a nice place and told John that she wanted to live there.

John received a surprise when he came home the first night after moving in with Jane. He went to hang up his clothes in the closet, but found that Jane had already put her clothes in the closet next to his.

The apartment in Bellevue was drafty when they left the garage door open. They entertained a lot of people there in the one bedroom. They entertained Stanley Donough, the head of Sears in the Northwest, John's law partners, and the person who was the richest man in the Northwest at that time. The room had a kitchen bar on one side of the room. They lived there for a year and a half. They decided that they needed more room and started looking for a bigger place.

On one of the coldest mornings of the year, John picked up Jack Elliot on his way to work. John had never met Jack Elliott before, and saw him waiting for the bus. John just happen to be driving by at the right time. On the way into Seattle, Mr. Elliot casually talk to John about his house. He said that his house that become too large for his family since his daughter had just married and moved out. John said that he was looking for house, and asked to come by the next Sunday to see it. J. and John came by the house on Sunday, and take their baby David with them in a basket. They fell in love with a house immediately and bought it two weeks later for cash. That was April 1950. The total purchase price was $27,000. John had received $22,000 from his father's estate, and $5000 from the estate of his law partner, Jim Bailey. Jane and John have now lived in the house for almost 50 years.

John Cartano died on July 19, 2005 at the age of 96. His obituary from the Seattle Times read as follows:

"Mementos told life of John Cartano, 96
By Bob Young
Seattle Times staff reporter

One of the few things Seattle lawyer and civic activist John Cartano wasn't good at was throwing things away.

Mr. Cartano, who died July 19, was a distinguished orator, decorated veteran, business leader and devoted husband. He was also something of a pack rat, according to his oldest daughter, Julie Rourke.

"He had a house full of everything he wrote, every picture he took and every important newspaper headline. Everything was filed," Rourke said.

Mr. Cartano died at the Sunrise Assisted Living facility in Bellevue. He was 96.

His life provided a museum's worth of mementos. He was a commencement speaker at his West Seattle High School graduation and a state champion high-school orator. He used his debating skills to graduate from Harvard Law School. During World War II, he commanded a PT boat and received the Navy and Marine Corps Medal of Honor for helping rescue 35 survivors from a burning troop-transport ship, John Penn, in the Solomon Islands area.

After the war he was a founder of the Seattle law firm Cartano, Botzer & Chapman. He served as president of the Seattle Chamber of Commerce in 1961-1962 and was a member of the steering committee that brought the World's Fair to Seattle. He also served as manager for Dwight Eisenhower's 1956 presidential campaign in the state of Washington.

As a lawyer, he specialized in personal-injury cases. "He was a great trial lawyer. He was a great communicator, related to people in juries and exuded confidence," said Frank Birkholz, a Seattle attorney, who joined Mr. Cartano's firm right out of law school and later became a partner there.

Rourke remembers going downtown as a young woman to visit her father. "He would take us to the courthouse to meet judges and attorneys, then we'd go to lunch at the Rainier Club, and it seemed like everybody on the streets knew my dad and shook his hand," she said.
Despite his many accomplishments, Rourke said, her father put family first. Mr. Cartano never tired of taking his seven children on skiing and boating trips, she said. He also took them on meticulously planned adventures abroad, including a six-week 1968 tour of Asian countries, including Indonesia, Taiwan and Cambodia. "We didn't go to stay in fancy resorts," said his daughter, Margaret Cartano Hewes. "We went to obscure places and saw people eat beetles."
Hewes said her father was curious about everything. "In the 1960s he was interested in what young people were doing so he bought a Beatles record just to find out for himself."

Mr. Cartano was married for 58 years to Jane Bronson Cartano, who died May 1.
When her parents first met, Rourke said, her father was immediately smitten with his future wife, and he proposed to her every day for three months until she accepted.

Later, the couple shared a passion for tending to about 30 fruit trees at their Bellevue home. "They enjoyed making jam and canning all kinds of fruit together. They made a huge production of this," Rourke said.

During his wife's final years, Mr. Cartano was a devoted caregiver as she battled Parkinson's disease, Hewes said.

In addition to Rourke and Hewes, Mr. Cartano is survived by five other children: David of Los Angeles, Robert of Seattle, Anna Gascoigne of Lynnwood and Helene Marcelia and Joan Savard of Bellevue; 13 grandchildren; and three great-grandchildren.

Services have been held. Remembrances may be sent to the American Diabetes Association."

Memorial services were held for John Cartano and his family home on July 22, 2005. The memorial services program read as follows:

In Memory of John Daniel Cartano

April 4, 1909 — July 19, 2005

I have fought a good fight, I have finished my course, I have kept the faith:
Henceforth there is laid up for me a crown of righteousness, which the Lord, the righteous judge, shall give me at that day.

2 Timothy 4:7-8

On This Day

Mend a quarrel. Search out a forgotten friend. Dismiss suspicion, and replace it with trust. Write a love letter. Share some treasure. Give a soft answer. Encourage youth. Manifest your loyalty in a word or deed.

Keep a promise. Find the time. Forego a grudge. Forgive an enemy. Listen. Apologize if you were wrong. Try to understand. Flout envy. Examine your demands on others. Think first of someone else. Appreciate, be kind, be gentle. Laugh a little more.

Deserve confidence. Take up arms against malice. Decry complacency. Express your gratitude. Worship your God. Gladden the heart of a child. Take pleasure in the beauty and wonder of the earth. Speak your love. Speak it again. Speak it still again. Speak it still once again.

Celebrant
Pastor Mary Klug

Opening Hymn
Alicia Lydick - “How Great Thou Art”

Welcome

First Reading
Helene Marcelia - 1 Corinthians 13:4-10,13

Second Reading
Joan Savard - Colossians 3:12-16

Sermon
Pastor Mary Klug

The Lord’s prayer
All

Symbolic Gifts
Grandchildren

Speakers
Julie Cartano Rourke
David John Cartano
Robert James Cartano
Anna Cartano Gascoigne (poem)
Betty Hoverter

Family Prayer
Margaret Hewes

Ending Hymn
Alicia Lydick - “Amazing Grace”

Blessing

“This is the most important one,” said Jesus ...“The Lord our God is the only Lord.
You must love the Lord your God with all your heart, and with all your soul, and with all your mind, and with all your strength. The second is this: ‘Love your neighbor as yourself.’ There is no commandment greater than these.”

Mark 12:29-3
Jonas U. Cartano Education Associate
Jos Cartano The name Jos Cartano appears in the New York City census of 1870. More information can be found in the NYC U.S. Census Index Archive.
Joseph Earl Cartano (name changed to Nelson during the Depression) The following e-mail message was received from Susan Porter:

Hello fellow Cartano family. I am the daughter of Joseph Earl Cartano. I believe he grew up in Annamosa Iowa the son of Guy and Alice Troy Cartano. They moved at some point to Cedar Rapids. My father changed his last name during the depression to Nelson. We were told that it was changed to receive employment. I know my father had 2 brothers. Bob and Bill. As I lived in New York State I knew very little about my Cartano family. I feel so blessed to have found this website. I feel connected in a wonderful way. Thank you for your work. I have moved to Missouri and feel I have come home to my roots. Again, thank you. If you have any information about my grandfather, Guy Cartano. I would appreciate knowing who he was, good or bad.Thanks again, Susan N. Porter
Juliette Cartano She is employed as a photographer in Paris, France by Agence de Photographes. Her website address is http://www.cjuliette.com/. Pictures of her are on her Facebook webpage at http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=681603323#/profile.php?id=681603323&v=photos&viewas=549527724. She is a member of 1,000,000 AGAINST THE NEW FACEBOOK LAYOUT!, Tumi The Poet MC, Pour le retour de P.Carles, C.Carrière, J.Delmas & Alain Gerber sur Musique, Petition to save the Polaroid, Chris "Daddy" Dave Y'all, A Tribe Called Quest, Mojoe, Johnny "Guitar" Watson - The Original Gangster of Love, Café Universel, Supporters du Fooball Club Paris Arc-en-Ciel, Strange Fruit Project, For those who love there hip-hop with a large dose of Funk and Jazz, RANDOM ACTS OF KINDNESS (make the world a more beautiful place), Forrest Whittaker is the best actor ever, WHERE'S D'ANGELO, Temple of Hip-Hop, ONUTSS, Ledisi FANS!!!!, Dancing Turtle Records, CDBaby.Com Rocks!, Stephanie McKay, N'dambi (soul singer), Wax Poetics, the RH Factor, Galerie Paule Friedland & Alexandre Rivault, OGM, je dis NON ! Pétition urgente Infléchir Projet de loi du 5 Février 08, Free West Papua, Amp Fiddler, Free Your Mind And Your Ass Will Follow, Mon Président est un beauf.
Lamburtus (Bert) Cartano Bert Cartano is on the far right, second row standing, in the historic photograph of the Anton and Caroline Klein Cartano family. He lived in Granger, Washington.

The Athena Press
Athena, Umatilla Co., Oregon
Friday, February 17, 1911
"Bert CARTANO has a new awning in front of his place of business on Main street"

An e-mail from Anna Louise (Cartano) Luper in May, 2007 gave the following information regarding Bert Cartano:

My name is Anna Louise (Cartano) Luper. I have just recently found out from Oregon 1880 census records that Anthony and Caroline Cartano were my great-grandparents. Lamburtus (Bert) and Anna Rebecca (Harden) Cartano were my grandparents. Richard and Velma (Basler) Cartano are my parents.

My grandfather, Bert, came to Athena, Oregon as a major league baseball player from Iowa, where he met my grandmother, Anna Harden. He stayed and they got married and had three children. Bert and my father, Richard, came to Granger, Washington in 1928. Where Richard met my mother, married and raised 5 girls. There are now children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren.
Laurence (Larry) Alan Cartano Larry Cartano was the vice president of an excavation company in Maryland. He had two step-daughters and a step-son.

See additional discussion of his early personal life in the section on David Garvin Cartano.
Lillian Bell Cartano Rupp The obituary in the local newspaper for Jessie Cartano Waln states that Lillian Rupp was one of the three surviving sisters of Jessie Cartano Waln, and that Lillian lived in Denver, Colorado, Iowa at that time.

The social security records show that Lillian was born on October 19, 1893, that her social security number was 521-96-4909, and that she applied for social securty under her husband's name. His social security number was 521-01-4610.

The 1905 Linn County, Iowa census shows that Lillie Cartano lived in Springville, Iowa.
Louise Cartano Louise Cartano is the fifth to the left, second row standing, in the historic photograph of the Anton and Caroline Klein Cartano family. She was a music teacher and sold victolas in Springville, Iowa. She never married.
Mable C. Cartano The 1905 Linn County, Iowa census shows that Mabel C. Cartano lived in Springville, Iowa.
Margaret Carolyn Cartano Fletcher Margaret Cartano was born on October 31, 1906 in Spokane, Washington. She married Jim Fletcher and had three children. She died in Birmingham, Michigan on March 14, 1975.
Margaret Cartano Hewes Margaret Cartano Hewes wrote the following e-mail to the Cartano Enquirer on March 29, 1999:

Jane [Magaret's oldest daughter] has been working on her clarinet. Her goal is to make the spring concert. She recieved a first place in the freestyle relay at the sixth grade state tournament last week. Julie [Magaret's youngest daughter] recieved high honors (only three out of 25) on her science fair project. She did a report and exhibit on how rainbows are formed. She was very proud. Otherwise, we are well. The attached is the family history that Jane wrote about herself. She is very into her history since she is a Dave Cartano disciple.

Love, Margaret

My name is Jane is Jane Edgeworth Hewes. I am 12 years old. I am a true American melting pot. My ancestors come from Ireland, Italy, Germany, France, England, and Scotland. My mother says that we are well represented. I live in Portland, Maine. My ambition is to be a veterinarian and have a dog shelter. My hobbies are collecting dolls, tennis, field hockey, and swimming.

Jane Hewes (October 21, 1986- ):

I love going over to my grandmother's house where my sister and I like to play with her dolls. She still has her dolls from when she was a girl. One time my cousins were there with us. We all dressed up and pretended to have a tea party with our "children". My favorite is her princess Elizabeth doll. Princess Elizabeth has so many pretty dresses. The nicest one is her coronation gown. It is light blue satin, and really long. One Christmas we gave her her own American Girl doll. She was so happy.

My mother, Margaret Hewes (September 28 1959- ):

My mother grew up in Bellevue, Washington. She lived on Lake Washington. Every day in the summer she swam with her six siblings in the lake. Her family once traveled for six weeks in the Orient. She went to places such as Singapore, Taiwan, Indonesia, Hong Kong and Japan. Her favorite spot was the ruins of Anchor Watt in Cambodia that have since been destroyed by terrible fighting in the country. In Bali, she went to a park that was filled with monkeys. In Japan she got a beautiful doll that has a music box in it. She still has it and displays it in the living room. She practiced law for 15 years and now she is a high school English teacher. She keeps us in line!

My grand mother Jane Bronson Cartano (February 5, 1921- ):

My Grandmother, Jane Bronson Cartano, grew up in Las Cruces, New Mexico. Her father owned the local newspaper, the Las Cruces Daily Sun. One time he wrote
an editorial that the townspeople disliked. They threatened to tar and feather him! He knew Pat Garrett, the sheriff who killed Billy the Kid after he escaped from jail. Growing up in New Mexico at that time was very wild. My grandmother attended Lauretta's Academy, a Catholic girl's boarding school. She was a day student. One day she forgot her veil and had to borrow one from a boarding student. Her mother was so mad when she came home with a head full of lice.

My great-grandmother, Florence Delaney Bronson (June 27, 1889-August 17, 1973):

Florence Bronson (people called her "Flossy") grew up in the small mining town of Highland, Wisconsin. Her father, Thomas Delaney, had six brothers and five sisters. His parents came from Ireland. He married Jane Dannenhauer. After school age, most of the young men were connected with the mining in some way, but Thomas hated mining. He set out for the wild west, leaving his wife and family behind, in hopes of striking it rich. Before long he had a rich working farm outside of Bristol, South Dakota, and the family joined him. Florence, her brothers, and the neighborhood kids rode a bobsled to school in the winter driven by her father. The school was one mile away. They had a very happy home until their mother died when Florence was eleven. The children were very sad and the housekeepers were mean. Finally her Aunt Bridget came to live with them and cared for them with more love.

My family can be traced back to the early 1700's. My middle name is Edgeworth. It comes from my great, great, great, great, great grandmother, Elizabeth Sneyd Edgeworth. She was the third wife of Richard Lovell Edgeworth (1774-1817). He was a writer and an inventor. They lived in Edgeworthtown, Ireland. Along my mother's paternal grandmother's line, my great, great, great, great, great, great, great, great-grandfather, Simon Hoyt, settled Charlestown on the north side of Massachusetts bay in 1629.

Along my paternal grandfather's line, my great, great grandmother was Sophia Caroline Klein (2/3/1830). She was born in Rhenish Prussia, Germany. She was a beautiful singer; at one time she and a boy sang a duet before the Emperor (probably Emperor Willhelm). She married Antonin Cartano and lived in Bavaria. Antonin's father migrated from northern Italy into Germany at the age of seven years. His trade was a silver smith. As a child, Antonin had a wealthy uncle from Milan who wanted to give him and education. Antonin tried to pass into Italy when he arrived in Switzerland but he was unable to because of the war between the two countries. He turned back and was apprenticed as a fresco painter. That was his trade when he came to this country but he never liked it. He had a farm in Iowa and twelve children. On one occasion, he was so poor that he had no money to give the church. The priest told him to give his cow. He never went back to church. His son, Daniel, is my great grandfather. He left the farm at the age of 12 to make a life for himself. He settled in Spokane, Washington as a linotype operator. His son, my grandfather, attended Harvard Law School during the depression and had seven successful children. My mother will earn her third degree (B.A., J.D., M.A.) this next year.
Margaret Joann Cartano Houser Margaret Houser is the sister of Gary E. Cartano.
Margaret Van Wie Percival Cartano Margaret Cartano was born in Muir, Ionia County, Michigan in 1875. She married Daniel Cartano on June 21, 1904 in Spokane, Washington. She was a school teacher for 11 years at Bryant School in Spokane, Washington. She died in 1948 in Seattle, Washington. The story behind her marriage to Daniel Cartano is set forth in the History section of this Web site.
Marie Cartano Kerns The obituary in the local newspaper for Jessie Cartano Waln states that Marie Kerns was one of the three surviving sisters of Jessie Cartano Waln, and that Marie lived in Cedar Rapids, Iowa at that time.
Olive Marguerite Cartano Abel Olive Marguerite Cartano Abel lived with her husband, Byron Abel, in Monticello, Iowa.

On December 7, 1983, Richard E. Abel wrote a letter to John Cartano stating that his mother, Olive, loved her flower garden and her grandchildren. She had great admiration for her father who was one of the most respected men in Monticello. He said that his parents, Olive and Byron, met and were married in Guttenburg, Iowa and lived in the general area.
Raffaele Cartano hi my name is francesca...i found your adress email on internet!sorry if i disturb you..i want ask to you if you know someone that name is raffaele cartano...because this person as american origin..but i was adopted when he was children from an italian family!now he live a naples and he want to fuound him origine..please if you know something contct me!thank.

francesca_lamponi@libero.it
Richard (Dick) Andrew Cartano Dick Cartano is on the far left, first row sitting, in the historic photograph of the Anton and Caroline Klein Cartano family. He grew up in Springfield, Iowa. He played baseball barehanded and worked some with horses with his brother Dan. He later moved to Monticello, Iowa. He had two daughters and one son.

On August 31, 1905, the local newspaper, page 6, reported that Richard Cartano was running a merry go-round at the county fair.

On December 7, 1983, Richard E. Abel wrote a letter to John Cartano stating that Richard was one of the most respected men in Monticello. His wife, Jennie, died when their daughter, Olive Marguerite Cartano Abel, was about 15 years old. Dick Cartano never remarried, but he employed the services of a housekeeper, Florence Goings. She lived in the home with her two daughters, Camille and Juanita. The home was subsequently occupied by Wilbur Cartano after Dick Cartano's death, but ownership of the house had passed outside the family by 1983.

The 75th anniversary notice by Monticello State Bank, Monticello, Iowa in 1950 listed Richard Cartano as the president and a director of Monticello State Bank.
Richard Bruce Cartano See discussion of his early personal life in the section on David Garvin Cartano.
Richard Cartano The Social Security records show that Richard Cartano's last known residence was in Granger, Washington 98932, and that the last payment location was Sunnyside, Washington 98944, Social Security No. 531-30-5149.
Robert Guy Cartano Robert Guy Cartano worked at Collins Radio. He retired in 1972. The Social Security records show that Robert Cartano died in November 1993, in Overton, Nebraska 68863, Social Security No. 478-12-9514.
Rowena (Rowie) Cartano College: University of the Philippines Los Baños, Los Baños, Laguna, Philippines.

Rowena comes from the Spanish line of the Cartano family. Her family ancestors have been in the Philippines since the early 1700s. On February 28, 2013, Rowie sent the following email explaining how the Cartanos came to the Phillipines:

I just learned based on stories passed on from one generation to another, and then as recollected by our older living relatives, that our great grandfather, Alberto Cartano who was born in 1908, was the grandson of a Spanish-Italian soldier who came to the Philippines during the Spanish colonization. I'm trying to see if we have records during that time but based on my research, most records were lost/destroyed during the Second World War. Sadly, it looks like it's almost impossible to trace ancestral records here now.
Rowena ( Rowie ) Cartano
rowecartano2@gmail.com
skype id: rowe.cartano
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Great-grandfather:
Pedro Cartano. Pedro Cartano had four children. Alberto was the oldest child.

Grandparents:
Alberto Cartano (1908-1996) --Bigaa, Cabuyao, Laguna, Philippines
and Gregoria Marinas ( 1906-1998)

Alberto's children:
Alberto had four children, Aurelio, Sr., Patricia, Remedios and Librado Cartano. They are now all living in Laguna, a province in Luzon, the northern part of the Philippines
first born : Aurelio Marinas Cartano Sr. - 1935, married to Julita Mastrili Lomboy 1936

Aurelio Sr.'s children:

Rene Cartano
Ronaldo Cartano
Rowena Cartano (myself)
Roberto Cartano
Rosamia Cartano Neri (Canada based)
Ricardo Cartano
Aurelio Cartano Jr.

Alberto's other children:

Patricia Cartano-Lagonera (deceased)
Remedios Cartano-Macayan
Librado Cartano (deceased)

My children are:

Ramil Alberto Cartano Cuanang (1998)
Julian Cartano Cuanang (1999)
Enoch Mikael Cartano Cuanang (2003)
Sonia Maria Cartano Piassa Sonia Maria Cartano Piassa is an investor in in S.B.C. Confeccoes Ltda., an English limited liability company. The company was incorporated on March 5, 1993. The company manufactures clothing accessories (specialty items).
Susan Cartano Nelson Porter Grew up in Elmira, NY; graduated from Syracuse.

Susan wrote the following e-mail: Hello fellow Cartano family. I am the daughter of Joseph Earl Cartano. I believe he grew up in Annamosa Iowa the son of Guy and Alice Troy Cartano. They moved at some point to Cedar Rapids. My father changed his last name during the depression to Nelson. We were told that it was changed to receive employment. I know my father had 2 brothers. Bob and Bill. As I lived in New York State I knew very little about my Cartano family. I feel so blessed to have found this website. I feel connected in a wonderful way. Thank you for your work. I have moved to Missouri and feel I have come home to my roots. Again, thank you. If you have any information about my grandfather, Guy Cartano. I would appreciate knowing who he was, good or bad.Thanks again, Susan N. Porter

My eldest daughter, Heather, lives maybe 20 miles from Pottsville.
Terace (Trace) Cartano Embree Trace Cartano is the sixth to the left, second row standing, in the historic photograph of the Anton and Caroline Klein Cartano family. She lived in Springville, Iowa where her husband was a depot agent. They later moved to Madrid, Iowa where he was an agent. They had two children, Erma and Bob. Erma died at age 16. Bob became an electrical engineer in St. Louis, Missouri.

The complete history of Trace Cartano is set forth in the History section of this Web site.
Tony Cartano The Library of Congress shows that he is the author or co-author of 19 books and publications. See the Books section of this Internet WebSite. One literary review states the following:

Editorial Reviews
From Publishers Weekly
This new translation of a 1980 French novel may be of interest only to those looking for literary connections. Most of the sprawling, impressionistic narration is by ``Anton Blackbird,'' a psychiatric patient in New York's Bellevue Hospital. Octogenarian Blackbird is a gifted painter and pianist and, in his Notebooks, a feverish writer. We follow him from his bourgeois Jewish youth in Prague to a Swiss sanatorium during World War I; then to Vienna, Berlin and Paris in the 1920s and 1930s. American psychiatrist Clockwork, as we see in his Notes, becomes obsessed with ``the truth'' about Blackbird, who says his real name is Anton Huka, lost literary genius. He may also be Antoine Choucas, famous French musician who killed his father and vanished in 1934. In addition to the Notebooks and Notes there are entries from a strange ``Bestiary of the Yellow Notebook,'' surrealistic visions of violence involving birds. Swollen with literary allusions and portentous omens about doomed loves, the novel is all-around heavy going.

Copyright 1987 Cahners Business Information, Inc.

From Library Journal
A literary critic and historian, Cartano as novelist shows his mastery of cultural history and fictional forms. In this novel, published in France in 1980 with the same title, he juxtaposes (as Italo Calvino might) the memoir of Blackbird, presumably a Jewish Viennese novelist and a longtime inmate of a New York asylum; his bestiary, where the memoir's intrigues are transposed surrealistically; and the journal of the resident psychoanalyst Clockwork, who is determined to prove Blackbird a former French concert pianist. Early on, the reader is led to believe that Blackbird might actually be sane, while Clockwork will become irrationally obsessed. A sophisticated thriller for larger fiction collections. Marilyn Gaddis Rose, Comparative Literature Dept., SUNY at Binghamton
Verna Marie Thompson Cartano She workedfor Rockwell Collins for 36 years and retired in 1998.
Wendy Lucille Cartano Reymer E-mail from Gary Cartano to David Cartano (July 14, 2009)

I guess you can throw my daughter Wendy Lucille Cartano Reymer into the mix with a GPA of 3.8 from Long Beach State.

She isn't a Doctor or Lawyer (with only a 3.8 GPA), but pretty high for the "Honest" John leg of the tree. She taught Math at a couple of schools in Long Beach then moved to Indianapolis, where she and her husband, Jeremy Reymer, have a business called Driving Ambitions. Placing semi-truck drivers into company trucks, on contract to the different companies in the mid-west, for shipping their products around the country. It saves companies a lot of money by not paying drivers to sit around till their trucks are loaded or when they have no products to be delivered at all, and also D.A. employee a lot of drivers and keep them busy moving products for companies that do. A very unique, efficient, and profitable business.
Wilbur Richard Cartano The Social Security records show that Wilbur Cartano died in July 1972 in Florida, Social Security No. 478-48-8192, and that his last known residence was Valrico, Florida 33595.

The obituary in the local newspaper for Wilbur Cartano reads as follows:

"VENICE, FLA.--Funeral services for Wilbur R. Cartano, 74, a Monticello resident most of his life, were held July 10 at Ewing Funeral home chapel in Venice. Cremation followed.

"Mr. Cartano died July 7 at Venice General hospital. He was born Aug. 13, 1897 in Monticello. He was married June 28, 1922 to Blanche Thompson.

"He farmed for many years in the Castle Grove area and was active in farm organizations. The Cartanos moved permanently to Florida a year ago after spending winters there for some nine years.

"He was a member of the Presbyterian church.

"Surviving are his widow; three sons, Richard of Walnut Creek, Calif., David of Coral Gables, Fla. And Lawrence of Lanhom, Md.; one daughter, Carol Ann of Coral Gables; seven grandchildren; two sisters, Mrs. Byron Abel of Monticello and Mrs. George Freshwater of Springville."

On March 20, 1999, David Garvin Cartano from Florida wrote the following letter to David John Cartano from Los Angeles concerning his grandfather, Dick Cartano, his father, Wilbur, and their early family life:

We all grew up with farming backgrounds. All four of us children went to the same one-room country schoolhouse and had the same teacher for our first eight grades (although, Dick and Carol had a few early years at another site). Our grandfather (Richard Andrew Cartano) was a widely known fellow--a gentle kind man whom I never saw really angry (obviously without the famous Cartano temper). Our dad was a cattle feeder--we had several acres of cement feeding lots--and fed many hundreds of cattle each year--we grew up on horses (I rode a horse to the country school (except in the dead of Iowa winter). Our mom was an exceptional woman who was an excellent piano player--she had much energy and we all would work all day, and in the evening I'd lay around on the living room floor and listen to an hour of Chopin, Bach and all the rest of the usual classicals (she played for several state events in Des Moines). We were fortunate to have lived in a kind of classical rural community setting that has largely disappeared today. We were also fortunate to have had a foot in two kinds of American life. I personally was able to observe the change from a horse powered life ( I mean real live horses) to the internal combustion and mechanized farm life of today--two really different life styles.

The following information was found at the following WebSite regarding Wilbur Cartano and his wife, Blanche:

http://www.cam-walnet.com/~huberj/d77.htm


Blanche Bernice Thompson was born on 23 Jun 1898 in Hopkinton farm, Del. Co., Iowa. She was christened. She died. She was buried.

She was married to Wilbur Richard Cartano on 28 Jun 1922. Wilbur Richard Cartano was born on 13 Aug 1897 in Monticello, Iowa. He died on 7 Jul 1972 in Venice, Florida. He was christened. He was buried in Ewing Funeral, Venice, Florida. Blanche Bernice Thompson and Wilbur Richard Cartano had the following children:

593 i. Carol Anne Cartano was born on 4 Jul 1923. She was christened. She died. She was buried.
+594 ii. Richard Bruce Cartano was born on 3 Jul 1925. He was christened. He died. He was buried.
595 iii. David Garvin Cartano was born on 6 Apr 1935. He was christened. He died. He was buried.
596 iv. Laurence Alan Cartano was born on 7 Nov 1938. He was christened. He died. He was buried.
William Cartano The 1905 Linn County, Iowa census shows that W. H. Cartano lived in Springville, Iowa.